Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Employment and the Family: Great Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal, 2002

Title details

SN: 5229
Title: Employment and the Family: Great Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal, 2002
Alternative title: Employment and the Family: Britain, 2002 and Seven-country Work-life
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-5229-1
Depositor: Crompton, R., City University. Department of Sociology
Principal investigator(s): Crompton, R., City University. Department of Sociology
National Centre for Social Research
International Social Survey Programme
Sponsor(s): Economic and Social Research Council
Grant number: R000239727
Other acknowledgements: Ms. Michaela Brockmann, Institute of Education, London (previous Research Officer for the project), and Dr. Clare Lyonette, Research Officer, Department of Sociology, City University, London (took over from Ms. Brockmann in September 2003).

Citation

The citation for this study is:

Crompton, R., National Centre for Social Research, International Social Survey Programme. (2005). Employment and the Family: Great Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal, 2002. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 5229, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-5229-1

Select the text above to add data citation in your outputs.

Select citation format: 
XML citation formats:  CSL  EndNote

Subject Categories

Family life and marriage - Social stratification and groupings
General - Employment and labour
Social attitudes and behaviour - Society and culture

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

This project explored the decline of the 'male breadwinner' model of the articulation of employment and family life, in which men were responsible for market work and women for unpaid caring. As women increasingly enter employment, has the gendered division of labour (understood as incorporating both paid and unpaid work) been shifted as a consequence and have gender relations within the family changed? Are women able to realise their individual aspirations, and has an increase in women's employment been followed by greater equality in money management between partners? As the work of caring is increasingly transferred out of the 'private' sphere, how have institutions, families and employers adapted to this new situation? Are adaptations in some countries more successful than in others?

In order to answer these questions, a cross-national comparative analysis was necessary. Thus, the project formed part of the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) 2002 module, Family and Changing Gender Roles III. The module concerned included a series of questions relating to work-life conflict as well as attitudes to gender roles and working mothers, and the allocation of money within the household. Some extra questions were included in the ISSP project (fielded in Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal) and a resulting harmonised seven-country data set was generated. The ISSP is conducted by the Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Data Archive for the Social Sciences (GESIS), based in Cologne, Germany. The full ISSP Family and Changing Gender Roles III dataset is available to order via the UK Data Archive - see under SN 5018. It is recommended that users order the full dataset to use alongside this one.

In the case of Britain, a further set of questions were added to the ISSP module, and thus a separate file of extended British data is included in this dataset. The British questions focused on working conditions and individual promotion aspirations. They were piloted alongside the British Social Attitudes Survey, 2002 (BSA - held at the Archive under SN 4838), conducted by the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen).

Users should note that the documentation for this study includes only the questionnaire. Details of sampling and other methodology may be found in the documentation for the relevant BSA 2002 (see under SN 4838) and ISSP studies.

A previous study by the same principal investigator on a similar topic, Women's Employment and Family Life in the United Kingdom, Norway, France, Czech Republic and Russia, 1996-1997, is also held at the Archive under SN 3926. This study also used data from ISSP.
Main Topics:
Topics covered included: gender; age; educational background; working mothers and related issues; gender roles; household work; attitudes to marriage; cohabitation and children; family decision-making; income; attitudes to work; working conditions; quality of life; parental employment; religious belief; household and employment characteristics; employment history.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Time period: 2002
Dates of fieldwork: BSA module: June-September 2002; ISSP module: June 2002-July 2003
Country: Czech Republic | Finland | France | Great Britain | Hungary | Norway | Portugal
Spatial units: Countries
Government Office Regions
Standard Statistical Regions
Observation units: Individuals
Kind of data: Numeric data
Individual (micro) level
Universe: Cross-national
Respondents to the BSA 2002 and ISSP 2002, in Great Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal.
Time dimensions: Cross-sectional (one-time) study
Sampling procedures: For information on sampling, please see documentation for the relevant BSA and ISSP studies.
Number of units: 2,312 (Britain), 10,447 (seven-country ISSP dataset)
Method of data collection: For information on methodology, please see documentation for the relevant BSA and ISSP studies.
Weighting: Weighting used. See documentation for the relevant BSA and ISSP studies for further details.
Data sources: BSA 2002 (see under SN 4838) and ISSP 2002 (see under SN 5018).

Thesaurus search on keywords

Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 07 September 2005
Copyright: Copyright National Centre for Social Research (BSA 2002 data) and Zentralarchiv fuer Empirische Sozialforschung (ISSP data)
Access conditions: The depositor has specified that registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. See terms and conditions of access for further information.
Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
Questionnaire 5229questionnaire.pdf 22
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_5229_Information.htm 6
READ File read5229.htm 11

Publications

View publications... Hide publications...

By principal investigator(s):
Crompton R., Brockmann, M. and Wiggins, R. (2003) 'A woman's place... employment and family life for men and women', in A. Park (ed.) British Social Attitudes: 20th annual report, London: Sage.

Crompton, R., Brockmann, M. and Lyonette, C. (2005) 'Attitudes, women's employment and the domestic division of labour: a cross-national analysis in two waves', Work, Employment and Society, 19(2), pp.213-233.

Crompton, R. and Lyonette, C. (2004) 'La conciliazone tra tempi di vita e orari di lavoro in Gran Bretagna e in Europa', Quaderni Rassegna Sindicale, Rivista Trimestrale, Anno 5, No. 4, October.

Crompton, R., Lewis, S. and Lyonette, C. (eds.) (2005) Work and life balance in Europe, London: Palgrave.

Crompton, R. and Lyonette, C. (2005) 'The new gender essentialism – domestic and family 'choices' and their relation to attitudes', British Journal of Sociology, July.

Resulting from secondary analysis:

Syntax/Code

No previously uploaded files

  (login required)

Upload syntax/code file


5229
Employment and the Family: Great Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal, 2002

I agree to the terms and conditions *

Confirm new syntax/code file version


A previous version of syntax file "" has already been uploaded and approved.

If you continue with this upload, the previous version of the syntax file will be overwritten with this new version.

This new version of the syntax file will be subject to the UK Data Service approval process before it becomes available for download.

Do you want to continue?

    


Back to top