Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Long-Term Trajectories of Crime in the United Kingdom, 1982-2013

Title details

SN: 7875
Title: Long-Term Trajectories of Crime in the United Kingdom, 1982-2013
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-7875-1
Depositor: Farrall, S., University of Sheffield. Centre for Criminological Research
Principal investigator(s): Farrall, S., University of Sheffield. Centre for Criminological Research
Gray, E., University of Sheffield. Centre for Criminological Research
Jennings, W., University of Southampton. Department of Politics
Sponsor(s): Economic and Social Research Council
Grant number: ES/K006398/1

Citation

The citation for this study is:

Farrall, S., Gray, E., Jennings, W. (2016). Long-Term Trajectories of Crime in the United Kingdom, 1982-2013. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 7875, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-7875-1

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Subject Categories

Crime and law enforcement - Law, crime and legal systems
Political behaviour and attitudes - Politics
Social attitudes and behaviour - Society and culture

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

The project for which this data was collated sought to explore the ways in which changes in economic and social policies resulted in changes in patterns of crime, victimisation and anxieties about crime and how shifts in social values affected national-level experiences and beliefs about crime and appropriate responses to it (such as support for punitive punishments like the death penalty). The researchers explored the long-term consequences of almost two decades (1979-1997) of neo-conservative and neo-liberal social and economic policies for the UK's criminal justice system and the general experience of crime amongst its citizens. Using the Thatcher and Major governments (1979-1997) as the case study, the research team explored the experiences of crime, victimisation and fear of crime at the national and regional levels, and for key socio-demographic groups, since the 1970s (and where possible earlier than this). In order to complete these analyses repeated cross-sectional surveys of citizens in the UK were collated in such a way that the data could be analysed using techniques associated with time series and age-period-cohort analyses (as well as more conventional techniques). The surveys collated were the British Crime Survey (now called the Crime Survey for England and Wales), the British Social Attitudes Survey and the British Election Study. These survey series are also available from the UK Data Service.

Main Topics:
This study covers the following topics: crime; fear of crime; attitudes about crime; perceptions of crime; victimisation; trust in the criminal justice system; various social and political attitudes; trust of various groups; political affiliation; engagement in politics; voting intention; past voting; media use; housing tenure; region of the UK; welfare receipts; standard socio-demographics.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Time period: January 1981 - December 2012
Country: United Kingdom
Spatial units: Countries
Government Office Regions
Observation units: Individuals
Families/households
Administrative units (geographical/political)
Kind of data: Numeric data
Universe: National
The Crime Survey for England and Wales (previously called The British Crime Survey) has collected data from people living in households in England and Wales. The British Social Attitudes Survey has collected data from people living in households in Britain, as has the British Election Study.
Time dimensions: Time Series
Sampling procedures: Simple random sample; Multi-stage stratified random sample
Method of data collection: Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Compilation or synthesis of existing material
Weighting: Weights are included in the datasets, see technical report.
Data sources: The data comes from The Crime Survey for England and Wales, (1982 to 2012), previously called The British Crime Survey, the British Social Attitudes Survey (1983-2012) and the British Election Study (2004-2013).

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Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 03 February 2016
Copyright: Copyright S. Farrall, W. Jennings and E. Gray. Copyright of the original British Social Attitudes data remains with NatCen Social Research. The original British Crime Survey/Crime Survey for England and Wales data remain Crown Copyright. Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.
Access conditions: The depositor has specified that registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. See terms and conditions for further information.
Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
Codebook for Collated Data File 7875_aggregate_audit_look_up_table.xlsx 23
Codebook for BES Data File 7875_bescms_audit__2004-2013.xlsx 15
Codebook for BSAS Data File 7875_bsas_audit_1983-2012.xlsx 26
Codebook for CSEW Data File 7875_bsc_csew_audit_1983-2012.xlsx 19
Technical Manual, 2015 7875_technical_manual_2015.pdf 630
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_7875_Information.htm 7
READ File read7875.htm 10

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Long-Term Trajectories of Crime in the United Kingdom, 1982-2013

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