Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Understanding Society: Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9, 2008-2016: Secure Access, National Grid Reference (Easting, Northing, OSGRDIND)

Title details

SN: 7332
Title: Understanding Society: Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9, 2008-2016: Secure Access, National Grid Reference (Easting, Northing, OSGRDIND)
Alternative title: United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study; UKHLS
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-7332-6
Series: Understanding Society [Understanding Society: Waves 1- , 2008-: Secure Access]
Depositor: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research
Principal investigator(s): University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research
Data collector(s): Kantar Public
Sponsor(s): Economic and Social Research Council
Department for Work and Pensions
Department for Education
Department for Transport
Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Department for Communities and Local Government
Scottish Government
Welsh Assembly Government
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Food Standards Agency
Department of Health
Northern Ireland Executive
Grant number: ES/K005146

Citation

The citation for this study is:

University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research. (2017). Understanding Society: Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9, 2008-2016: Secure Access, National Grid Reference (Easting, Northing, OSGRDIND). [data collection]. 5th Edition. UK Data Service. SN: 7332, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-7332-6

Select the text above to add data citation in your outputs.

Select citation format: 
XML citation formats:  CSL  EndNote

Subject Categories

Consumer behaviour - Economics
Family life and marriage - Social stratification and groupings
General - Education
General - Employment and labour
Income, property and investment - Economics
Social attitudes and behaviour - Society and culture
Social indicators and quality of life - Society and culture

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

Understanding Society (UK Household Longitudinal Study), which began in 2009, is conducted by the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), at the University of Essex, and the survey research organisations are Kantar Public and NatCen. It builds on and incorporates, the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), which began in 1991. The latest release combines the first seven waves of Understanding Society data with harmonised data from all eighteen waves of the BHPS. As multi-topic studies, the purpose of Understanding Society and BHPS is to understand short- and long-term effects of social and economic change in the UK at the household and individual levels. The study has a strong emphasis on domains of family and social ties, employment, education, financial resources, and health.

Understanding Society is an annual survey of each adult member of a nationally representative sample. The same individuals are re-interviewed in each wave approximately 12 months apart. When individuals move they are followed within the UK and anyone joining their households are also interviewed as long as they are living with them. The study has five sample components: the general population sample, a boost sample of ethnic minority group members, an immigrant and ethnic minority boost sample (from wave 6), participants from the BHPS and the Innovation Panel (which is a separate standalone survey (see SN 6849 for EUL version; SN 7083 for Special Licence version; and SN 7332 for Secure Access version). The fieldwork period is for 24 months. Data collection primarily uses computer assisted personal interviewing (CAPI), but includes a telephone mop up, and from Wave 7 of Understanding Society, web-based interviews. One person completes the household questionnaire. Each person aged 16 or older participates in the individual adult interview and self-completed questionnaire. Youths aged 10 to 15 are asked to respond to a paper self-completion questionnaire. For the general and BHPS samples biomarker, genetic and epigenetic data are also available (see SN 7251).

Further information about the survey may be found on the Understanding Society main stage webpage.

The Innovation Panel is conducted as part of Understanding Society. It is designed for experimental and methodological research relevant to longitudinal surveys. As far as practical its design, content, and data collection procedures are similar to the main stage Understanding Society survey, held at the UK Data Archive under SNs 6614 (End User Licence version), 6931 (Special Licence) and 6676 (Secure Access). It is a multi-topic household survey representative of the population of Great Britain. Data collection takes place annually mainly using computer assisted personal interviewing (CAPI). One person completes the household questionnaire. Each person aged 16 or older answers the individual adult interview and self-completion questionnaire. Young people aged 10 to 15 years are asked to respond to a paper self-completion questionnaire. The Innovation Panel has multiple experimental studies in which households are randomly assigned to a particular instrument or survey procedure. Experiments can relate to survey procedures, questionnaire design, or substantive social science questions. The experiments are described in the User Manual and in Understanding Society Working Papers. Further information about the Innovation Panel is also available on the main Innovation Panel webpage.

Secure Access Dataset:
The Understanding Society: Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9, 2008-2016: Secure Access, National Grid Reference (Easting, Northing, OSGRDIND) dataset contains British National Grid postcode grid references (at 1m resolution) for each household surveyed, derived from the ONS National Statistics Postcode Directory (NSPD). Grid references are presented in terms of Eastings and Northings, which are distances in metres (east and north, respectively) from the origin (0,0), which lies to the west of the Scilly Isles. Each grid reference is given a positional quality indicator to denote the accuracy of the grid reference. In the majority of cases, the assigned grid reference relates to the building of the matched address closest to the postcode mean. No grid references are provided for postcodes in the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

The Secure Access version of Understanding Society: Innovation Panel 2008-2016 includes all variables in the End User Licence version, plus files containing the 3 variables relating to the National Grid Reference for each household: Easting, Northing and positional quality indicator (OSGRDIND). All other files are the same as in the End User Licence version, which is held under SN 6849.

Related UK Data Archive studies:
The Secure Access version of the dataset has more restrictive access conditions than standard End User Licence or Special Licence access datasets (see 'Access' section below). Further details and links to the less restrictive versions can be found on the Understanding Society series Key data page.

For the fifth edition (August 2017), Waves 8 and 9 have been added with accompanying documentation, and Waves 1 to 7 redeposited with some data edits, including grid reference files. See the documentation file '7332_ip1-ip8_changes_collated.pdf' for details of the changes.

Main Topics:
The survey instrument is constructed using modules. For a fuller listing of modules and questionnaire content see the ISER Innovation Panel Dataset Documentation webpage. Experiments are described in the User Manual for the Innovation Panel.

The household questionnaire includes a composition listing of all household members and collects information about gender, date of birth, marital and employment status, and relationship to the household respondent. The household questionnaire also has questions about housing, mortgage or rent payments, material deprivation, and consumer durables and cars.

The individual interview is asked of every person in the household aged 16 or over, and covers: demographics, baseline information, family background, ethnicity and national identity; religion; partnership and fertility histories; health, disability and caring; current employment and earnings; parenting and childcare arrangements; contact with non-resident children; benefit payments; household finances; consents to administrative data linkage. See the User Guide for additional modules carried only in some of the waves. A proxy module, a much shortened version of the individual questionnaire, collects demographic, health, and employment information, as well as a summary income measure.

The adult self-completion questionnaire was a pencil-and-paper instrument (PAPI) at Waves 1 and 3, and in Waves 4-7 included an experimental comparison with Computer Assisted Self-Completion (CASI). It includes subjective questions, particularly those which are potentially sensitive or require more privacy. For example, the self-completion questionnaire covers feelings of depression, sleep behaviour, neighbourhood participation and belonging, life satisfaction, and attributes of friends. There was no adult self-completion questionnaire at Wave 2.

The youth self-completion questionnaire (also PAPI) is given to children aged 10-15 years in the household. It covers computer and technology use, relationships with parents, feelings about areas of life, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and educational plans.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Dates of fieldwork: Wave 1: January - April 2008; Wave 2: March - June 2009; Wave 3: April - July 2010; Wave 4: March - July 2011; Wave 5: May – August 2012; Wave 6: February – July 2013; Wave 7: May – October 2014; Wave 8: May-September 2015; Wave 9: May-September 2016.
Country: Great Britain
Spatial units: Countries
Government Office Regions
British National Grid
Observation units: Individuals
Families/households
Kind of data: Numeric data
Alpha/numeric data
Individual (micro) level
Universe: National
Households and their individual members resident in Great Britain.
Time dimensions: Longitudinal/panel/cohort
Sampling procedures: Multi-stage stratified random sample
Two-stage stratified systematic sample - see documentation for details
Number of units: Wave 1: 1,489 households;
Wave 2: 1,122 households;
Wave 3: 1,027 households;
Wave 4: 1,381 households;
Wave 5: 1,226 households;
Wave 6: 1,189 households;
Wave 7: 1,407 households;
Wave 8: 1,330 households;
Wave 9: 1,245 households.
Method of data collection: Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview; Self-completion
Web-based survey
Weighting: Weighting used. See documentation for details.

Thesaurus search on keywords

View keywords... Hide keywords...
ABSENTEEISMACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTACCESS TO FACILITIES
ACCESS TO HEALTH SERVICESACCOUNTSADOLESCENTS
ADOPTED CHILDRENAGEAGGRESSIVENESS
ALCOHOL USEALCOHOLIC DRINKSANXIETY
APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENTARTISTIC ACTIVITIESASPIRATION
ASSAULTATTITUDESBEDROOMS
BIRTH WEIGHTBOOK READERSHIPBREAST-FEEDING
BRITISH POLITICAL PARTIESBROADBANDBULLYING
BUSINESSESCARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONSCARE OF DEPENDANTS
CARE OF THE DISABLEDCARE OF THE ELDERLYCAREGIVERS
CARERS' BENEFITSCENTRAL HEATINGCHILD BENEFITS
CHILD CARECHILD DAY CARECHILD SUPPORT PAYMENTS
CHILDBIRTHCHILD-MINDERSCHILDREN
CINEMA ATTENDANCECITIZENSHIPCLIMATE CHANGE
CLOTHINGCOHABITATIONCOLOUR TELEVISION RECEIVERS
COMMUNITY BEHAVIOURCOMMUTINGCOMPUTERS
CONCERT GOINGCONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENTCONFECTIONERY
CONSUMER GOODSCONTACT (LAW)COSTS
COUNCIL TAXCRIME VICTIMSCULTURAL ACTIVITIES
CULTURAL GOODSCULTURAL IDENTITYDAY NURSERIES
DEATHDEBILITATIVE ILLNESSDEBTS
DEGREESDELIVERY (PREGNANCY)DEPRESSION
DISABILITIESDISABLED PERSONSDISEASES
DIVORCEDOMESTIC APPLIANCESDONATIONS TO CHARITY
DRIVING LICENCESECONOMIC ACTIVITYEDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONSELECTRIC POWER SUPPLYELECTRONIC GAMES
EMOTIONAL STATESEMPLOYEESEMPLOYERS
EMPLOYMENT HISTORYEMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIESEMPLOYMENT PROGRAMMES
EMPLOYMENTENERGY CONSUMPTIONENTERTAINMENT
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATIONENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATIONENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
ETHNIC GROUPSEXPENDITUREFACILITIES
FAMILIESFAMILY DISORGANIZATIONFAMILY ENVIRONMENT
FAMILY LIFEFAMILY SIZEFATHER'S PLACE OF BIRTH
FATHERSFINANCIAL EXPECTATIONSFINANCIAL RESOURCES
FINANCIAL SUPPORTFLOORSFOOD
FREQUENCYFRIENDSFRIENDSHIP
FRUITFUEL OILSFUELS
FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENTFURNISHED ACCOMMODATIONFURTHER EDUCATION
GAS SUPPLYGENDERGENERAL CERTIFICATE OF SECONDARY EDUCATION
GLOBAL WARMINGGREAT BRITAINGRID REFERENCES
HAPPINESSHEALTH SERVICESHEALTH
HEARING IMPAIRMENTSHEATING SYSTEMSHEIGHT (PHYSIOLOGY)
HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONSHIGHER EDUCATIONHOBBIES
HOLIDAYSHOME CONTENTS INSURANCEHOME OWNERSHIP
HOMEWORKHOURS OF WORKHOUSE PRICES
HOUSEHOLD BUDGETSHOUSEHOLD INCOMEHOUSEHOLDS
HOUSESHOUSEWORKHOUSING BENEFITS
HOUSING CONDITIONSHOUSING FACILITIESHOUSING FINANCE
HOUSING NEEDSHOUSING TENUREHOUSING
ILL HEALTHINCENTIVESINCOME TAX
INCOMEINCOME-RELATED BENEFITSINDUSTRIES
INFANTSINSURANCEINTEREST (FINANCE)
INTERNET ACCESSINTERNET USEINTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
INTERPERSONAL CONFLICTINTERPERSONAL RELATIONSINVESTMENT RETURN
INVESTMENTIN-VITRO FERTILIZATIONJOB CHANGING
JOB DESCRIPTIONJOB HUNTINGJOB SATISFACTION
JOB SEEKER'S ALLOWANCELANDLORDSLANGUAGES
LEAVELEAVING HOME (YOUTH)LEISURE TIME ACTIVITIES
LEISURE TIMELIFE SATISFACTIONLIVING CONDITIONS
LOCAL TAX BENEFITSMANAGERSMARITAL STATUS
MARRIAGE DISSOLUTIONMARRIAGEMARRIED MEN
MARRIED WOMENMATERNITY BENEFITSMATERNITY LEAVE
MEDICAL PRESCRIPTIONSMENTAL HEALTHMOBILE PHONES
MORTGAGESMOTHER'S PLACE OF BIRTHMOTHERS
MOTOR PROCESSESMOTOR VEHICLE VALUEMOTOR VEHICLES
MULTIPLE BIRTHSMUSEUMSMUSIC EVENTS
NATIONALISMNATIONALITYNEIGHBOURHOODS
NEIGHBOURSNEONATAL DEATHSOCCUPATIONAL PENSIONS
OCCUPATIONAL QUALIFICATIONSOCCUPATIONAL TRAININGONE-PARENT FAMILIES
OVERTIMEPAINPARENT RESPONSIBILITY
PARENTAL DEPRIVATIONPARENTAL ROLEPARENTAL SUPERVISION
PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPPARENTSPARTICIPATION
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENTPENSION BENEFITSPERSONAL IDENTITY
PHYSICAL ACTIVITIESPHYSICAL MOBILITYPLACE OF BIRTH
PLACE OF RESIDENCEPOLITICAL ALLEGIANCEPOLITICAL ATTITUDES
POLITICAL INTERESTPOVERTYPREGNANCY
PREMATURE BIRTHSPRIVATE PERSONAL PENSIONSPRIVATE SCHOOLS
PRIVATE SECTORPROMOTION (JOB)PUBLIC SECTOR
PUBLIC TRANSPORTQUALIFICATIONSQUALITY OF LIFE
RATE REBATESREADING (ACTIVITY)REDUNDANCY
RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONRELIGIOUS ATTENDANCERENT REBATES
RENTED ACCOMMODATIONRENTSRESIDENTIAL MOBILITY
RETIREMENTRISKROOMS
RURAL AREASSATELLITE RECEIVERSSATISFACTION
SAVINGSSAVOURY SNACKSSCHOOL PUNISHMENTS
SCHOOL-LEAVING AGESELF-EMPLOYEDSIBLING RELATIONSHIP
SIBLINGSSICK PERSONSSICKNESS AND DISABILITY BENEFITS
SLEEPSMOKING CESSATIONSOCIAL ACTIVITIES (LEISURE)
SOCIAL ATTITUDESSOCIAL CAPITALSOCIAL CLASS
SOCIAL HOUSINGSOCIAL INEQUALITYSOCIAL LIFE
SOCIAL PARTICIPATIONSOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITSSOCIAL SECURITY CONTRIBUTIONS
SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUSSPORT SPECTATORSHIPSPORT
SPOUSESSTANDARD OF LIVINGSTATE RETIREMENT PENSIONS
STEPCHILDRENSTRESS (PSYCHOLOGICAL)STUDENT TRANSPORTATION
STUDENTSSTUDYSUBCONTRACTING
SUBSIDIARY EMPLOYMENTSUPERVISIONSUPERVISORS
SWIMMINGTAKE-AWAY MEALSTAXATION
TELEPHONE CALLSTELEPHONESTELEVISION VIEWING
TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENTTHEATRE ATTENDANCETIED HOUSING
TIMETRAINING COURSESTRAINING
TRANSPORTTRAVELLING TIMETRUANCY
TRUSTUNDERAGE DRINKINGUNEARNED INCOME
UNEMPLOYEDUNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITSUNEMPLOYMENT
UNFURNISHED ACCOMMODATIONURBAN AREASVEGETABLES
VIDEO RECORDERSVISION IMPAIRMENTSVOLUNTARY WORK
VOTING BEHAVIOURVOTING INTENTIONVOTING
WAGE INCREASESWAGESWEIGHT (PHYSIOLOGY)
WELSH (LANGUAGE)WIDOWEDWORKPLACE
YOUTH

Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 21 August 2013
Latest edition: 21 August 2017 (5th Edition)
Copyright: Copyright Economic and Social Research Council
Access conditions: Registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor will be informed about usage. Controlled data requirements and conditions also apply. Further information is available from Access to the Secure Lab. In addition, the Service is required to request explicit permission from the data owner prior to providing the researcher with access to the data.
Available to UK HE/FE applicants only.

Please note:
Since these data are more sensitive and/or pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence or under a Special Licence, they are not available for download but may be accessed through Secure Access. Access requires accreditation as an ESRC Accredited Researcher, completion of face-to-face training, and agreement to the Secure Access User Agreement and the Licence Compliance Policy. This is to ensure that the guarantee of confidentiality given to survey respondents is protected. Applications are screened by the UK Data Archive and the individual or institution having ownership of the data (or their designated authority), and access is only granted to those researchers requiring data for statistical research purposes and who can justify their need for the data. Users who obtain access to these data are also required to read and follow the Microdata Handling and Security: Guide to Good Practice.

Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
UK Data Archive Data Dictionary, Waves 1 - 5 7332allfiles_ukda_data_dictionary_waves1-5.pdf 12314
UK Data Archive Data Dictionary, Waves 6 - 9 7332allfiles_ukda_data_dictionary_waves6-9.pdf 10522
Innovation Panel, Descriptions of Geographical Identifiers - November 2011 7332a_geographical_identifiers_nov11.pdf 560
Innovation Panel, Waves 1 - 7: Geographical Identifiers Lookup Tables 7332a_geographical_lookup_tables_waves1_7.pdf 307
Changes to IP Waves 1-8 June 2017 7332_ip_waves_1-8_changes_collated.pdf 420
Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9: User Manual 7332_ip_waves_1-9_user_manual_june_2017.pdf 1072
Innovation Panel, Waves 6 and 7 w_indresp Revisions February 2016 7332_ip_waves_6-7_revisions_2016.pdf 321
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Address Record Form 7332_ip_wave_1_address_record_form.pdf 1012
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_1_advance_letters.pdf 418
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Consent Forms 7332_ip_wave_1_consent_forms.pdf 499
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_1_participant_correspondence.pdf 455
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_1_project_instructions.pdf 1149
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_1_questionnaires.pdf 2322
Innovation Panel, Wave 1: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_1_tech_report.pdf 596
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Address Record Forms 7332_ip_wave_2_address_record_forms.pdf 1648
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_2_advance_letters.pdf 1430
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Consent Forms 7332_ip_wave_2_consent_forms.pdf 617
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_2_information_leaflets.pdf 686
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_2_participant_correspondence.pdf 3468
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_2_project_instructions.pdf 2366
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_2_questionnaires.pdf 1983
Innovation Panel, Wave 2: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_2_tech_report.pdf 1311
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Advance Record Forms 7332_ip_wave_3_address_record_forms.pdf 2115
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_3_advance_letters.pdf 560
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_3_information_leaflet.pdf 577
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_3_participant_correspondence.pdf 863
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_3_project_instructions.pdf 2056
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_3_questionnaires.pdf 4260
Innovation Panel, Wave 3: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_3_tech_report.pdf 1263
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Address Record Forms 7332_ip_wave_4_address_record_forms.pdf 3354
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_4_advance_letters.pdf 472
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Consent Form 7332_ip_wave_4_consent_form_economic_records.pdf 597
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_4_informationleaflets.pdf 1217
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_4_participant_correspondence.pdf 1166
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_4_project_instructions.pdf 3242
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_4_questionnaires.pdf 8163
Innovation Panel, Wave 4: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_4_techreport.pdf 816
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Address Record Forms 7332_ip_wave_5_address_record_forms.pdf 865
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_5_advance_letters.pdf 619
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_5_info_leaflets.pdf 1086
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_5_participant_correspondence.pdf 1538
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_5_project_instructions.pdf 3000
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_5_questionnaires.pdf 6939
Innovation Panel, Wave 5: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_5_tech_report.pdf 581
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Address Record Forms 7332_ip_wave_6_address_record_forms.pdf 831
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_6_advance_letters.pdf 4888
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_6_infoleaflets.pdf 1035
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_6_participant_correspondence.pdf 996
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_6_project_instructions.pdf 2958
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_6_questionnaires.pdf 14988
Innovation Panel, Wave 6: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_6_tech_report.pdf 1558
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Advance Letters 7332_ip_wave_7_advance_letters.pdf 4834
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Information Leaflets 7332_ip_wave_7_infoleaflets.pdf 914
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Participant Correspondence 7332_ip_wave_7_participant_correspondence.pdf 3524
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Project Instructions 7332_ip_wave_7_project_instructions.pdf 2728
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_7_questionnaires.pdf 18255
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_7_tech_report.pdf 981
Innovation Panel, Wave 7: Timings Data Files 7332_ip_wave_7_timings.pdf 333
Innovation Panel, Wave 8: Emails 7332_ip_wave_8_emails.pdf 158
Innovation Panel, Wave 8: Interviewer Materials 7332_ip_wave_8_interviewer_materials.pdf 3647
Innovation Panel, Wave 8: Letters 7332_ip_wave_8_letters.pdf 4004
Innovation Panel, Wave 8: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_8_questionnaires.pdf 10802
Innovation Panel, Wave 8: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_8_tech_report.pdf 1021
Innovation Panel, Wave 9: Emails 7332_ip_wave_9_emails.pdf 724
Innovation Panel, Wave 9: Interviewer Materials 7332_ip_wave_9_interviewer_materials.pdf 3899
Innovation Panel, Wave 9: Letters 7332_ip_wave_9_letters.pdf 4464
Innovation Panel, Wave 9: Questionnaires 7332_ip_wave_9_questionnaires.pdf 9316
Innovation Panel, Wave 9: Technical Report 7332_ip_wave_9_tech_report.pdf 2098
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_7332_Information.htm 7
READ File read7332.htm 12

Publications

View publications... Hide publications...

By principal investigator(s):
All Understanding Society – Innovation Panel Publications – June 2017

Al Baghal, T. (2016) The impact of dependent interviewing wording and survey factors on reporting of change, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2016-04. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Al Baghal, T. (2016) 'Last year your answer was …: the impact of dependent interviewing wording and survey factors on reporting of change', Field Methods, 29(1), pp.61-78. doi: 10.1177/1525822X16645073

Al Baghal, T. (ed.), Allum, N., Auspurg, K., Blake, M., Booker, C.L., Crossley, T. F., … Winter, J. (2014) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 6: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-04. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Al Baghal, T. (ed.), Blom, A.G., Burton, J., Booker, C.L., Cernat, A., Fairbrother, M., … Yan, T. (2015) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 7: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2015-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Al Baghal, T. (ed.) Creighton, M., Dykema, J., Gaia, A., Cernat, A., Garbarski, D., …Yan, T. (2016) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 8: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2016-02. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Al Baghal, T. and Lynn, P. (2014) Using motivational statements in web instrument design to reduce item missing rates in a mixed-mode context, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-02. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Al Baghal, T. and Lynn, P. (2015) 'Using motivational statements in web-instrument design to reduce item-missing rates in a mixed-mode context', Public Opinion Quarterly, 79(2), pp.568-579. doi: 10.1093/poq/nfv023

Auspurg, K., Iacovou, M., and Nicoletti, C. (2017) 'Housework share between partners: experimental evidence on gender-specific preferences', Social Science Research. doi: 10.1016/j.ssresearch.2017.01.003

Auspurg, K., Iacovou, M., and Nicoletti, C. (2014) Housework share between partners: experimental evidence on gender identity, University of York Discussion Papers in Economics, No. 14/20. York: University of York. Department of Economics and Related Studies.

Auspurg, K., Iacovou, M., and Nicoletti, C. (2015) Housework share between partners: experimental evidence on gender identity, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2015-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Bianchi, A., Biffignandi, S., and Lynn, P. (2016) Web-CAPI sequential mixed mode design in a longitudinal survey: effects on participation rates, sample composition and costs, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2016-08. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Boreham, R. and Constantine, R. (2008) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 1: technical report - prepared for ISER, London: National Centre for Social Research.

Brown, M., and Calderwood, L. (2013) Can encouraging respondents to contact interviewers to make appointments boost co-operation rates and save costs? Evidence from a randomised experiment in the UK, CLS Working Paper Series, No. 2013/9. London: Institute of Education. Centre for Longitudinal Studies.

Brown, M., and Calderwood, L. (2014) 'Can encouraging respondents to contact interviewers to make appointments reduce fieldwork effort? Evidence from a randomized experiment in the UK', Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology, 2(4), pp.484-497. doi: 10.1093/jssam/smu017

Burton, J., Laurie, H., and Uhrig, S.C. N. (2008) Understanding Society. Some preliminary results from the Wave 1 Innovation Panel, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2008-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Burton, J., Laurie, H. and Uhrig, S.C.N. (2010) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 2: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2010-04. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Burton, J. (ed.), Auspurg, K., Burton, J., Cullinane, C., Delavande, A., Fumagalli, L., … Zafar, B. (2013) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 5: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-06. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Burton, J. (ed.) with Budd, S., Burton, J., Gilbert, E., Jäckle, A., McFall, S.L., and Uhrig, S.C.N. (2011) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 3: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2011-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Burton, J. (ed.), Budd, S., Gilbert, E., Burton, J., Jäckle, A., Kaminska, O., … Calderwood, L. (2012) Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 4: results from methodological experiments, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2012-06. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Calderwood, L. (2016) Reducing non-response in longitudinal surveys by improving survey practice, PhD thesis, London: University College London.

Cernat, A. (2013) The impact of mixing modes on reliability in longitudinal studies, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2013-09. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Cernat, A. (2014) Impact of mixed modes on measurement errors and estimates of change in panel data, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Cernat, A. (2015) Evaluating mode differences in longitudinal data. Moving to a mixed mode paradigm of survey methodology, PhD thesis, Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Cernat, A. (2015) 'The impact of mixing modes on reliability in longitudinal studies', Sociological Methods and Research, 44(3), pp.427-457. doi: 10.1177/0049124114553802

Cernat, A. (2015) 'Impact of mode design on measurement errors and estimates of individual change', Survey Research Methods, 9(2), pp. 83-99. doi: 10.18148/srm/2015.v9i2.5851

Cernat, A. (2015) Using equivalence testing to disentangle selection and measurement in mixed modes surveys, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2015-01. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Cernat, A. and Lynn, P. (2014) The role of email addresses and email contact in encouraging web response in a mixed mode design, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-10. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Collins, D. and Mitchell, M. (2014) Role of mode in respondents' decisions to participate in IP5: findings from a qualitative follow-up study, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Copps, J. and Plimmer, D. (2013) The journey to employment: a guide to understanding and measuring what matters for young people, [S.l.]: Inspiring Impact.

Corrado, L. and Joxhe, M. (2016) The effect of survey design on extreme response style: rating job satisfaction, CEIS Tor Vergata Research Papers Series, No. 365. Rome: University of Rome Tor Vergata. Centre for Economic and International Studies.

Couper, M.P. (2012) Assessment of innovations in data collection technology for Understanding Society: a report to the Economic and Social Research Council, Swindon: Economic and Social Research Council.

d'Ardenne, J. and Blake, M. (2012) Developing expenditure questions: findings from focus groups, IFS Working Paper Series, No. W12/18. London: Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Dixon, T. (2015) Creating strong communities: how to measure the social sustainability of new housing developments, Cobham: The Berkeley Group.

Dixon, T. and Woodcraft, S. (2016) Creating strong communities - measuring social sustainability in new housing development, Cobham: The Berkeley Group.

Fairbrother, M. (2017) 'When will people pay to pollute? Environmental taxes, political trust and experimental evidence from Britain', British Journal of Political Science, doi: 10.1017/S0007123416000727

Gaia, A. (2017) The effect of respondent incentives on panel attrition in a sequential mixed-mode design, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2017-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Galizzi, M. M., Machado, S. R., and Miniaci, R. (2016) Temporal stability, cross-validity, and external validity of risk preferences measures: experimental evidence from a UK representative sample, SSRN Research Paper Series. Rochester, N.Y.

Gilbert, E. (2015) Sources of measurement error in panel surveys, PhD thesis, Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Gilbert, E.E. (2015) 'A comparison of branched versus unbranched rating scales for the measurement of attitudes in surveys', Public Opinion Quarterly, 79(2), pp. 443-470. doi: 10.1093/poq/nfu090

Gush, K., Scott, J. and Laurie, H. (2013) Households' responses to spousal job loss: 'all change' or 'carry on as usual'?, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2013-13. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Gush, K., Scott, J. and Laurie, H. (2013) Households' responses to spousal job loss: 'all change' or 'carry on as usual'?, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-04. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Gush, K., Scott, J., and Laurie, H. (2015) 'Households' responses to spousal job loss: 'all change' or 'carry on as usual'?', Work, Employment and Society, 29(5), pp.703-719. doi: 10.1177/0950017014556411

Gush, K., Scott, J., and Laurie, H. (2015) Job loss and social capital: the role of family, friends and wider support networks, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2015-07. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Holford, A. and Pudney, S. (2014) Survey design and the determinants of subjective wellbeing: an experimental analysis, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-06. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Holford, A. and Pudney, S. (2015) Survey design and the determinants of subjective wellbeing: an experimental analysis, IZA Discussion Papers, No. 8760. Bonn: Institute for the Study of Labor.

Jäckle, A. and Eckman, S. (2016) Is that still the same? Has that changed? On the accuracy of measuring change with dependent interviewing, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2016-06. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Jäckle, A., Lynn, P. and Burton, J. (2013) Going online with a face-to-face household panel: initial results from an experiment on the Understanding Society Innovation Panel, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Jäckle, A., Lynn, P., and Burton, J. (2015) 'Going online with a face-to-face household panel: effects of a mixed mode design on item and unit non-response', Survey Research Methods, 9(1), pp. 57-70. doi: 10.18148/srm/2015.v9i1.5475

Jäckle, A. and Pudney, S. (2015) Survey response behaviour and the dynamics of self-reported health and disability: an experimental analysis, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2015-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Kaminska, O. and Lynn, P. (2017) The implications of alternative allocation criteria in adaptive design for panel surveys, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2017-02. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2011) The effect of a mixed mode wave on subsequent attrition in a panel survey: evidence from the Understanding Society Innovation Panel, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2011-06. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2012) Mode-switch protocols: how a seemingly small design difference can affect attrition rates and attrition bias, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2012-28. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2012) Mode-switch protocols: how a seemingly small design difference can affect attrition rates and attrition bias, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2012-07. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2012) The propensity of older respondents to participate in a general purpose survey, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2012-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2013) 'Alternative sequential mixed-mode designs: effects on attrition rates, attrition bias, and costs', Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology, 1(2), pp. 183-205. doi. 10.1093/jssam/smt015

Lynn, P. (2013) Longer interviews may not affect subsequent survey participation propensity, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-07. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2013) Targeted response inducement strategies on longitudinal surveys, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-02. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2014) 'Longer interviews may not affect subsequent survey participation propensity', Public Opinion Quarterly, 78(2), pp.500-509. doi. 10.1093/poq/nfu015

Lynn, P. (2014) Targeted initial letters to longitudinal survey sample members: effects on response rates, response speed, and sample composition, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-08. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2015) 'Targeted response inducement strategies on longitudinal surveys' in U. Engel, B. Jann, P. Lynn, A. Scherpenzeel, and P. Sturgis (eds.) Improving survey methods: lessons from recent research, New York; London: Routledge. Ch. 27:322-338.

Lynn, P. (2016) The advantage and disadvantage of implicitly stratified sampling, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2016-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P. (2016) 'Targeted appeals for participation in letters to panel survey members', Public Opinion Quarterly, 80(3), pp. 771-782. doi: 10.1093/poq/nfw024

Lynn, P. and Jäckle, A. (2017) Mounting multiple experiments on longitudinal social surveys: design and implementation considerations, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2017-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Lynn, P., Uhrig, S.C.N., and Burton, J. (2010) Lessons from a randomised experiment with mixed-mode designs for a household panel survey, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2010-03. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Mowbray, J., Raeside, R., Hall, H., and Robertson, P. (2016) 'Social networking sites and employment status: an investigation based on Understanding Society data', in IDIMC 2016: Exploring our Digital Shadow: from Data to Intelligence - conference proceedings. Loughborough: University of Loughborough. LISU. , pp.75-85.

Nandi, A. and Platt, L. (2011) Effect of interview modes on measurement of identity, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2011-02. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Nandi, A. and Platt, L. (2017) 'Are there differences in responses to social identity questions in face-to-face versus telephone interviews? Results of an experiment on a longitudinal survey', International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 20(2), pp.151-166. doi: 10.1080/13645579.2016.1165495

Nicolaas, G., Calderwood, L., Lynn, P., and Roberts, C. (2014) Web surveys for the general population: how, why and when?, Southampton: National Centre for Research Methods.

OECD (2013) 'Methodological considerations in the measurement of subjective well-being' in OECD Guidelines on measuring subjective well-being, Paris: OECD Publishing. Ch. 2:61-138.

Pudney, S. (2010) An experimental analysis of the impact of survey design on measures and models of subjective wellbeing, ISER Working Paper Series, No. 2010-20. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Pudney, S. (2010) An experimental analysis of the impact of survey design on measures and models of subjective wellbeing, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2010-01. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Robson, M., Asaria, M.,Tsuchiya, A., Ali, S., and Cookson, R. (2016) Eliciting the level of health inequality aversion in England, CHE Research Papers, No. 125. York: University of York. Centre for Health Economics.

Sala, E., Knies, G., and Burton, J. (2013) Propensity to consent to data linkage: experimental evidence from the Innovation Panel on the role of three survey design features, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2013-05. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Sala, E., Knies, G., and Burton, J. (2014) 'Propensity to consent to data linkage: experimental evidence on the role of three survey design features in a UK longitudinal panel', International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 17(5), pp. 455-473. doi. 10.1080/13645579.2014.899101

Sturgis, P. and Brunton-Smith, I. (2011) An assessment of the potential utility of interviewer observation variables for reducing non-response error in the National Survey for Wales: a report prepared for the Welsh Government, Cardiff: Welsh Government.

Uhrig, S.C.N. (2011) 'Using experiments to guide decision making in Understanding Society: introducing the Innovation Panel' in S.L. McFall and C. Garrington (eds.) Understanding Society: early findings from the first wave of the UK's Household longitudinal study, Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research. Ch. 13, pp.117-124.

Uhrig, S.C.N. (2012) 'Understanding panel conditioning: an examination of social desirability bias in self reported height and weight in panel surveys using experimental data', Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 3(1): 120-136.

Uhrig, S.C.N., Bryan, M.L., and Budd, S. (2012) UKHLS Innovation Panel household wealth questions: preliminary analysis, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2012-01. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Wood, M. and Kunz, S. (2014) CAWI in a mixed mode longitudinal design, Understanding Society Working Paper Series, No. 2014-07. Colchester: University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research.

For links to publications based on Understanding Society, including those listed below and others, please see the Understanding Society Publications webpage.


Burton, J., Nandi, A. and Platt, L. (2008) Who are the UK's ethnic minority groups? Issues of identification and measurement in a longitudinal survey, ISER Working Paper 2008-2. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2008-02

Gray, M., Uhrig, S. C. N., Constantine, R., d'Ardenne, J. and Blake, M. (2008) Cognitive testing of Understanding Society. The UK Household Longitudinal Study questionnaire, ISER Working Paper 2008-4. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2008-04

Lynn, P. (2009), Sample design for Understanding Society, ISER Working Paper 2009-1. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2009-01

Berthoud, R., Fumagalli, L., Lynn, P., Platt, L. (2009) Design of the ethnic minority boost sample, ISER Working Paper 2009-2. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2009-02

Nandi, A. and Platt, L. (2009) Developing ethnic identity questions for Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study, ISER Working Paper 2009-3. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2009-03

Rabe, B. (2011) Geographical identifiers in Understanding Society, version 1, ISER Working Paper 2011-1. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2011-01

Nandi, A., Platt, L. (2011) Effect of interview modes on measurement of identity, ISER Working Paper 2011-2. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2011-02

Booker, C. and Sacker, A. (2011) ‘Limiting long-term illness and subjective well-being in families’, Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 3(1), pp.41-65.

Lynn, P. (2011) Maintaining cross-sectional representativeness in a longitudinal general population survey, ISER Working Paper 2011-4. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2011-04

Ferragina, E., Tomlinson, M. and Walker, R. (2011) ‘Determinants of participation in the United Kingdom: a preliminary analysis’, Understanding Society .

Knies, G. (2011) ‘Life satisfaction and material well-being of young people in the UK’, Understanding Society .

Lynn, P., Burton, J., Kaminska, O., Knies, G. and Nandi, A. (2012) An initial look at non-response and attrition in Understanding Society, ISER Working Paper 2012-2. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2012-02

Lynn, P. (2012) The propensity of older respondents to participate in a general population survey, ISER Working Paper 2012-3. Retrieved 14 November 2014 from http://research.understandingsociety.org.uk/publications/working-paper/2012-03

Knies, G., Burton, J. and Sala, E. (2012) ‘Consenting to health record linkage: evidence from a multi-purpose longitudinal survey of a general population’, BMC Health Services Research, 12(1), p.52.

Longhi S. (2013) Individual pro-environmental behaviour in the household context, ISER Working Paper 2013-21. Retrieved 17 February 2014 from https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/working-papers/iser/2013-21.pdf

McFall, S. L. and Buck, N. (2013) ‘Understanding Society – the UK Household Longitudinal Survey: a resource for demographers’, in Applied Demography and Public Health, Springer Netherlands, pp.357-369.

Tippett, N., Wolke, D. and Platt, L. (2013) ‘Ethnicity and bullying involvement in a national UK youth sample’ Journal of Adolescence, 36(4), pp.639-649.

Resulting from secondary analysis:

For links to publications based on Understanding Society, including those listed below and others, please see the Understanding Society Publications webpage.

Demey, D., Berrington, A., Evandrou, M. and Falkingham, J. (2011) 'The changing demography of mid-life, from the 1980s to the 2000s', Population Trends, 145 (Autumn), pp.16-34. Retrieved October 19th, 2011 from http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/population-trends-rd/population-trends/no--145--autumn-2011/ard-pt145-changing-demography.pdf

Demey, D., Berrington, A., Evandrou, M., Falkingham, J. and McGowan, T. (2011) How has mid-life changed in Britain since the 1980s?, CPC Briefing Paper No. 2. Retrieved October 19th, 2011 from http://www.cpc.ac.uk/resources/downloads/Mid_Life_in_Britain_briefing2.pdf

McAloney, K. (2012) 'Inter-faith relationships in Great Britain: prevalence and implications for psychological well-being', Mental Health, Religion and Culture, (online), DOI:10.1080/13674676.2012.714359

Berrington, A., Stone, J. and Falkingham, J. (2013) The impact of parental characteristics and contextual effects on returns to the parental home in Britain, CPC Working Paper 29.

Crawford, C., Dearden, L. and Greaves, E. (2013) When you are born matters: evidence for England, IFS Reports, R80, London: Institute for Fiscal Studies. doi: 10.1920/re.ifs.2013.0080. Retrieved August 19, 2013 from http://www.ifs.org.uk/comms/r80.pdf

Crawford, C., Dearden, L. and Greaves, E. (2013) The impact of age within academic year on adult outcomes, IFS Working Papers, W13/07, May. London: Institute for Fiscal Studies. doi: 10.1920/wp.ifs.2013.1307. Retrieved August 19, 2013 from http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp201307.pdf

Demey, D., Berrington, A., Evandrou, M. and Falkingham, J. (2013) 'Pathways into living alone in mid-life: diversity and policy implications', Advances in Life Course Research, 18(3), pp.161-174. doi:10.1016/j.alcr.2013.02.001

McAloney, K. (2013) ‘Mixed’ religion relationships and well-being in Northern Ireland’, Journal of Religion and Health, pp.1-10.

Demey, D., Berrington, A., Evandrou, M. and Falkingham, J. (2014) 'Living alone and psychological well-being in mid-life: does partnership history matter?', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 168(5), pp.403-410. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2013-202932

Hutchinson, J., White, P.C.L. and Graham, H. (2014) 'Differences in the social patterning of active travel between urban and rural populations: findings from a large UK household survey', International Journal of Public Health. doi 10.1007/s00038-014-0578-2

Correa, S., Durrant, G.B. and P.W. Smith (2014) When to stop calling? Using call record data to assess nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study, paper presented to the International Workshop on Household Survey Nonresponse, 2 September 2014, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Longhi S. (2014) 'Cultural diversity and subjective wellbeing', IZA Journal of Migration, 3(13), DOI: 10.1186/2193-9039-3-13

Kumar,A., Rotik, M. and Ussher, K. (2014) Pay progression: understanding the barriers for the lowest paid, London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. Retrieved April 23, 2015, from http://www.cipd.co.uk/binaries/pay-progression_2014-understanding-the-barriers-for-the-lowest-paid.pdf

Cruise, S.M., Patterson, L., Cardwell, C.R. and O'Reilly, D. (2015) 'Large panel-survey data demonstrated country-level and ethnic minority variation in consent for health record linkage', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 68, pp.684-692. doi:10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.01.011 (ISSN 0895-4356).

Dodds, R.M., Syddall, H.E., Cooper, R. et al. (2014) 'Grip strength across the life course: normative data from twelve British studies', PLoS ONE, 9(12): e113637. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113637

Evans, K. (2016)Working well: how employers can improve the wellbeing and productivity of their workforce, London: Social Market Foundation. Retrieved February 2nd, 2016 from http://www.smf.co.uk/publications/working-well-how-employers-can-improve-the-wellbeing-and-productivity-of-their-workforce/

Keohane, N. (2016) Longer lives, stronger families: the changing nature of intergenerational support, London: Social Market Foundation. ISBN: 978-1-910683-08-8. Retrieved February 8th, 2016 from http://www.smf.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Publication-Longer-Lives-Stronger-Families-The-changing-nature-of-intergenerational-support.pdf

Wakeling, P., Berrington, A. and Duta, A. (2015) Investigating an age threshold for independence at postgraduate level, Bristol: Higher Education Funding Council for England. Retrieved June 7th, 2016 from http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rereports/Year/2015/pgind/Title,105806,en.html

Wheatley, D. and Bickerton, C., (2016) 'Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport', Journal of Cultural Economics, forthcoming. doi: 10.1007/s10824-016-9270-0.

Zischka L. (2016) The link between 'giving' behaviours and a healthy social environment, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Reading. See record at http://centaur.reading.ac.uk/66399

Chng, S., White, M., Abraham, C. and Skippon, S. (2016) 'Commuting and wellbeing in London: the roles of commute mode and local public transport connectivity', Preventive Medicine, Jul;88:182-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.04.014. Epub 2016 Apr 16.

Emerson, E., Hatton, C., Baines, S.and Robertson, J. (2016) 'The physical health of British adults with intellectual disability: cross sectional study', International Journal for Equity in Health, 15:11 doi:10.1186/s12939-016-0296-x

Emerson, E., Krnjacki, K., Llewellyn, G., Vaughan, C., Kavanagh, A. (2016) 'Perceptions of safety and exposure to violence in public places among working age adults with disabilities or long-term health conditions in the UK: Cross sectional study', Public Health 135, pp.91-6. doi:10.1016/j.puhe.2015.10.036

Waller, S. Deane, J., Bradley, M., Hosking, I. and Clarkson, J. (2016) Inclusive Design Toolkit [website], University of Cambridge, Engineering Design Centre. http://www.inclusivedesigntoolkit.com/

Hatton, C., Emerson, E., Robertson, J. and Baines, S. (2017) 'The mental health of British adults with intellectual impairments', Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 30, pp.188-197. doi: 10.1111/jar.12232

Evans, K., Holkar, M. and Murray. (2017) Overstretched, overdrawn, underserved: financial difficulty and mental health at work, Money and Mental Health Policy Institute. Retrieved June 8th, 2017 from http://www.moneyandmentalhealth.org/financialwellbeingatwork/

Williams, M. and E. Gardiner (2017). ‘The power of personality at work: core self-evaluations and earnings in the United Kingdom’, Human Resource Management Journal. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1748-8583.12162/abstract

Sacker, A., Ross, A., MacLeod, C.A., Netuveli, G. and Windle, G. (2017) 'Health and social exclusion in older age: evidence from Understanding Society, the UK household longitudinal study', J Epidemiol Community Health, 71(7), pp.681-690. doi:10.1136/jech-2016-208037

MacLeod, C.A., Ross, A., Sacker, A. and Windle, G. (2017) 'Re-thinking social exclusion in later life: a case for a new framework for measurement', Ageing and Society, September, pp.1-38. doi:10.1017/S0144686X17000794

Melo, P.C., Ge, J., Craig,T., Brewer, M.J. and Thronicker, I. (2018) 'Does work-life balance affect pro-environmental behaviour? Evidence for the UK using longitudinal microdata, Ecological Economics, 145, March, pp.170–181. doi:10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.09.006

Syntax/Code

No previously uploaded files

  (login required)

Upload syntax/code file


7332
Understanding Society: Innovation Panel, Waves 1-9, 2008-2016: Secure Access, National Grid Reference (Easting, Northing, OSGRDIND)

I agree to the terms and conditions *

Confirm new syntax/code file version


A previous version of syntax file "" has already been uploaded and approved.

If you continue with this upload, the previous version of the syntax file will be overwritten with this new version.

This new version of the syntax file will be subject to the UK Data Service approval process before it becomes available for download.

Do you want to continue?

    


Back to top