Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Growing Up in Scotland: Cohort 2, Sweeps 1-2, 2011-2013: Special Licence Access

Title details

SN: 7432
Title: Growing Up in Scotland: Cohort 2, Sweeps 1-2, 2011-2013: Special Licence Access
Alternative title: GUS
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-7432-2
Series: Growing Up in Scotland [Growing Up in Scotland, 2005-]
Depositor: ScotCen Social Research
Principal investigator(s): ScotCen Social Research
Sponsor(s): Scottish Government
Other acknowledgements: Collaborators on GUS include the MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow and the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships at the University of Edinburgh.

Citation

The citation for this study is:

ScotCen Social Research. (2017). Growing Up in Scotland: Cohort 2, Sweeps 1-2, 2011-2013: Special Licence Access. [data collection]. 2nd Edition. UK Data Service. SN: 7432, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-7432-2

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Subject Categories

Child development and child rearing - Social stratification and groupings
Childbearing, family planning and abortion - Health
General - Health
Nutrition - Health
Primary, pre-primary and secondary - Education
Social and occupational mobility - Social stratification and groupings
Social attitudes and behaviour - Society and culture
Use and provision of specific social services - Social welfare policy and systems
Youth - Social stratification and groupings

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

The Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study is a large-scale longitudinal social survey which follows the lives of groups of Scotland's children from infancy through to their teens, and aims to provide important new information on young children and their families in Scotland. The study forms a central part of the Scottish Government's strategy for the long-term monitoring and evaluation of its policies for children, with a specific focus on the early years. Unlike other similar cohort studies, this survey has a specifically Scottish focus.

The primary objective of GUS is to address a significant gap in the evidence base for early years policy monitoring and evaluation. The data collected will also serve wider policy research requirements for cross-sectional analysis of issues affecting children and young people. The study seeks both to describe the characteristics, circumstances and experiences of children in their early years (and their parents) in Scotland and to generate a better understanding of how children's start in life can shape their longer term prospects and development with particular reference to the role of early years service provision.

The development, fieldwork and analysis for GUS are being undertaken by ScotCen Social Research in collaboration with the MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow and the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, based at the University of Edinburgh. The survey design consisted of recruiting an initial total of 8,000 parents in 2005, comprising two sub-cohorts of children (5,000 from birth, 3,000 from age two), and then interviewing parents annually, until their child reached age five. Funding has been secured for the first eight sweeps of data collection, comprising Cohort 1 (2005-2012) (Cohort 1, see under SN 5760) and the introduction of a new birth cohort (Cohort 2) in 2011. Cohort 2, the second birth cohort, involved 6,127 children being recruited in 2011 aged around ten months. Further information about the survey may be found on the Growing Up in Scotland web site.

New edition information
For the second edition (October 2017), data and documentation for Sweep 2 were added to the study.

Special Licence data
Following a statistical disclosure review of these data by the Depositor they have been re-classified as Special Licence (SL). An End User Licence (EUL) Teaching Dataset, which contains a reduced version of the first six waves of data is available from the UK Data Service under SN 8088 Growing Up in Scotland: Cohort 1, Sweeps 1-6, 2005-2011: Teaching Dataset.

Main Topics:
The questionnaire at Sweep 1 covered the following topics: household information; infant feeding; parenting support; non-resident parents; parenting styles and activities; childcare; child health and development; employment and economic activity; income and financial stress; education and identity; housing and accommodation; interviewer observations. The self-completion section covered: language and play skills of child; feelings parents might have when caring for young children; parental health; feelings in last four weeks; smoking, alcohol and drug use; relationships with family and friends.

At Sweep 2, the following data were collected from the child's main carer: parenting; parent-child relationship; child's relationship with siblings; parental support and service use; non-resident parents; child health and development; activities (child and parent); child's diet; childcare; pre-school; transition to primary school; parental health and health behaviours; parental relationship; employment and education; income, expenditure and financial stress; housing and accommodation; neighbourhood and community. Objective measurements taken included: child's height and weight; cognitive assessments (BAS-3 Naming Vocabulary and Picture Similarities); and interviewer observations of parent-child interactions and child behaviour.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Dates of fieldwork: Sweep 1: 1 January 2011 to February 2012. Sweep 2: 15 January 2013 to 15 March 2014.
Country: Scotland
Spatial units: Health Boards
Observation units: Individuals
Families/households
Kind of data: Numeric data
Individual (micro) level
Universe: National
Children born between March 2010 and February 2011 who were resident in Scotland at 10 months of age at Sweep 1, and approximately three years old at Sweep 2, and the main carers of those children (usually the child's mother).
Time dimensions: Longitudinal/panel/cohort
Sampling procedures: Multi-stage stratified random sample
Number of units: Sweep 1: 6,127 cases; Sweep 2: 5,019 cases.
Method of data collection: Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Psychological measurements; Observation; Physical measurements
Sweep 2: psychometric tests using the British Ability Scales 3rd edition.
Weighting: Weighting used. See user guide for details.

Thesaurus search on keywords

View keywords... Hide keywords...
ACCIDENTSADOPTED CHILDRENADOPTIVE PARENTS
ADVICEAGEALCOHOL USE
ALLERGIESAMPHETAMINESANTENATAL CARE
ANTHROPOMETRIC DATAARTHRITISBACTERIAL AND VIRUS DISEASES
BANK ACCOUNTSBEDROOMSBIRTH ORDER
BIRTH WEIGHTBODY CIRCUMFERENCE MEASUREMENTSBOOK USE
BOOKSBOTTLE-FEEDINGBREAST-FEEDING
BROKEN FAMILIESCANCERCANNABIS
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASESCAREGIVERSCARERS' BENEFITS
CARSCHILD BEHAVIOURCHILD BENEFITS
CHILD CARECHILD CUSTODYCHILD DAY CARE
CHILD SUPPORT PAYMENTSCHILD WELFARECHILDBIRTH
CHILD-MINDERSCHILD-MINDINGCHILDREN
COHABITATIONCOMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICESCONGENITAL DISORDERS
CONTACT (LAW)DAY NURSERIESDEBILITATIVE ILLNESS
DENTAL HEALTHDEPRESSIONDIABETES
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM DISORDERSDRUG ABUSEDRUG ADDICTION
EAR DISEASESEARLY CHILDHOODECONOMIC ACTIVITY
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUNDEDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATESEDUCATIONAL FEES
EMOTIONAL STATESEMPLOYEESEMPLOYMENT HISTORY
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMMESEMPLOYMENTEPILEPSY
ETHNIC GROUPSEYE DISEASESFAMILY DISORGANIZATION
FAMILY ENVIRONMENTFAMILY INFLUENCEFAMILY LIFE
FAMILY MEMBERSFAMILY PLANNINGFAMILY SIZE
FATHERSFINANCIAL DIFFICULTIESFINANCIAL RESOURCES
FLEXIBLE WORKING TIMEFOSTER CHILDRENFOSTER PARENTS
FREQUENCYFRIENDSFRIENDSHIP
GENDERGRANDPARENTSHAEMATOLOGIC DISEASES
HEALTH ADVICEHEALTH CONSULTATIONSHEALTH
HEARING IMPAIRMENTSHEART DISEASESHEATING SYSTEMS
HOLIDAYSHOME CONTENTS INSURANCEHOSPITALIZED CHILDREN
HOURS OF WORKHOUSEHOLD INCOMEHOUSEHOLDERS
HOUSEHOLDSHOUSING BENEFITSHOUSING CONDITIONS
HOUSING FACILITIESHOUSING TENUREHOUSING
ILL HEALTHIMMUNIZATIONINCOME
INCOME-RELATED BENEFITSINFANT FEEDINGINFANTS
INFORMATION NEEDSINFORMATION SOURCESJOB SEEKER'S ALLOWANCE
LABOUR COMPLICATIONSLANGUAGE DEVELOPMENTLANGUAGES USED AT HOME
LIVING CONDITIONSLOCAL TAX BENEFITSMARITAL HISTORY
MARITAL STATUSMATERNITY BENEFITSMATERNITY LEAVE
MATERNITY PAYMENTAL DISORDERSMOTHERS
MULTIPLE BIRTHSMUSCULOSKELETAL DISEASESNEIGHBOURHOODS
NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASESNURSERY SCHOOLSNUTRITIONAL AND METABOLIC DISEASES
ONE-PARENT FAMILIESPARENT PARTICIPATIONPARENT RESPONSIBILITY
PARENTAL LEAVEPARENTAL ROLEPARENTAL SUPERVISION
PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPPARENTSPARTNERSHIPS (PERSONAL)
PERSONAL CONTACTPERSONAL ORAL HYGIENEPHYSIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
PLACE OF BIRTHPLAY GROUPSPLAY
PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONSPREGNANCYPRE-PRIMARY EDUCATION
PRE-PRIMARY SCHOOLSPRESCHOOL CHILDRENPRIVATE GARDENS
QUALIFICATIONSREADING (ACTIVITY)RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION
RELIGIOUS ATTENDANCERESPIRATORY TRACT DISEASESROOMS
RURAL AREASSAVINGSSCOTLAND
SELF-EMPLOYEDSICKNESS AND DISABILITY BENEFITSSITTING
SLEEPSMOKINGSOCIAL PROGRAMMES
SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITSSOCIAL SUPPORTSOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS
SPOUSE'S EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUNDSPOUSE'S EMPLOYMENTSPOUSE'S ETHNIC GROUP
SPOUSE'S PLACE OF BIRTHSPOUSESSTATUS IN EMPLOYMENT
SUBSTANCE USESUPERVISORY STATUSTAX RELIEF
TEETHTELEVISION VIEWINGUNEMPLOYED
URBAN AREASVASCULAR DISEASESVISION IMPAIRMENTS
VISITS (PERSONAL)VITAMINSWAGES
WALKINGWEIGHT (PHYSIOLOGY)WORKING CONDITIONS
WORKING MOTHERSWORK-LIFE BALANCE

Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 19 December 2013
Latest edition: 03 October 2017 (2nd Edition)
Copyright: Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland
Access conditions: The depositor has specified that registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage.
Additional special conditions of use also apply. See terms and conditions for further information. In addition, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data.

Please note:
Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them that take the form of a Special Licence (SL). The SL requires the completion of an additional application form, agreement to the conditions of the SL, the signature(s) of the researcher(s), and the explicit permission of the data owners to release the data to the researcher(s). This is to ensure that the guarantee of confidentiality given to survey respondents is protected. SL applications are screened by the UK Data Archive and the data owners and data are only released to those researchers requiring data for statistical research purposes and who can justify their need for the SL data.

Researchers are required to keep the data under conditions of greater security than required under the standard End User Licence. The Microdata Handling and Security: Guide to Good Practice explains how to meet these conditions.
Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
Dataset Documentation - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 1 7432_gus_bc2_sw1_data_documentation.pdf 736
Project Instructions - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 1 7432_gus_bc2_sw1_project_instructions.pdf 710
Questionnaire and Showcards - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 1 7432_gus_bc2_sw1_questionnaire.pdf 956
UK Data Archive Data Dictionary - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 1 7432_gus_bc2_sw1_ukda_data_dictionary.pdf 4499
User Guide - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 1 7432_gus_bc2_sw1_user_guide.pdf 511
Dataset Documentation - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 2 7432_gus_bc2_sw2_data_documentation.pdf 775
Project Instructions - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 2 7432_gus_bc2_sw2_project_instructions.pdf 854
Questionnaire and Showcards - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 2 7432_gus_bc2_sw2_questionnaire.pdf 1077
UK Data Archive Data Dictionary - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 2 7432_gus_bc2_sw2_ukda_data_dictionary.pdf 4220
User Guide - Birth Cohort 2 Sweep 2 7432_gus_bc2_sw2_user_guide.pdf 459
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_7432_Information.htm 6
READ File read7432.htm 10

Publications

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By principal investigator(s):

Cohort 1 Publications:

Anderson, S. et al. (2007) Growing Up in Scotland: a study following the lives of Scotland's children, Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. ISBN 978 0 7559 5330 1. Retrieved November 23, 2007 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/01/17162004/15

Scottish Executive (2007) Sweep 1 - topic research findings, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 1(2007). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/01/08145434/2

Scottish Executive (2007) Sweep 1 - topic research findings, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 2(2007). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/01/08145458/2

Scottish Executive (2007) Sweep 1 - topic research findings, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 3(2007). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/01/08145521/2

Scottish Executive (2007) Sweep 1 - topic research findings, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 4(2007). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/01/08145545/2

Anderson, S. et al. (2007) Growing Up in Scotland: sweep 1 overview report, Edinburgh: Scottish Executive.

Bradshaw, P., Martin, C. and Cunningham-Burley, S. (2008) Growing Up In Scotland study: GUS exploring the experience and outcomes for advantaged and disadvantaged families, Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/03/12101843/11

Bradshaw, P., Jamieson, L. and Wasoff, F. (2008) Growing Up In Scotland study: Use of informal support by families with young children, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/03/12110018/12

Jamieson, L., Ormston, R. and Bradshaw, P. (2008) Growing Up In Scotland study: Growing up in rural Scotland, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/03/12110107/11

Scottish Executive (2008) Summary of Findings from Year 2, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 1(2008). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/02/01151619/2

Scottish Executive (2008) Experiences of pre-school education, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 2(2008). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/02/13101840/3

Scottish Executive (2008) Issues of child health and development at ages 1-2 and 3-4 years, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 3(2008). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/02/13101913/3

Scottish Executive (2008) Parenting styles and parental support, GUS Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 4(2008). Retrieved October 15, 2008 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/02/13101944/2

Skafida, V. (2008) Breastfeeding in Scotland: the impact of advice for mothers, Centre for Research on Families and Relationships Briefing 36, February. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.crfr.ac.uk/reports/rb36forweb.pdf

Ormston, R. and Wasoff, F. (2008) Growing Up in Scotland: sweep 2 overview report, Edinburgh: Scottish Government.

Scottish Government (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 3 non-resident parent report, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 1(2009). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/263536/0078815.pdf

Scottish Government (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 3 food and activity report, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 2(2009). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/11112938/2

Scottish Government (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: parenting and the neighbourhood context, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 3(2009). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/11153825/2

Scottish Government (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: multiple childcare provision and its effects on child outcomes, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 4(2009). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/11154033/2

Bromley, C. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: the impact of children's early activities on cognitive development, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 5(2009). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/11154220/2

Bradshaw, P. et al. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: parenting and the neighbourhood context, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/13143448/11

Bradshaw, P. and Wasoff, F. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: multiple childcare provision and its effects on child outcomes, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/13143410/10

Bromley, C. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: the impact of children's early activities on cognitive development, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/03/16101519/11

Marryat, L., Reid, S. and Wasoff, F. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 3 non-resident parent report, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/01/21085002/8

Marryat, L., Skafida, V. and Webster, C. (2009) Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 3 food and activity report, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved August 18, 2009 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2009/01/21085143/9

Skafida, V. (2009) 'The relative importance of social class and maternal education for breast-feeding initiation', Public Health Nutrition, 12(12), pp.2285-92.

Barnes, M., Chanfreau, J. and Tomaszewski, W. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: the circumstances of persistently poor children,
Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 1(2010). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/21131609/2

Bromley, C. and Cunningham-Burley, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: health inequalities in the early years, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 2(2010). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/21132105/3

Marryat, L. and Martin, C. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: maternal mental health and its impact on child behaviour and development, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 3(2010). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/21131836/2

Bradshaw, P. and Tipping, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: children's social, emotional and behavioural characteristics at entry to primary school, Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 4(2010). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/21131912/2

Bradshaw, P. and Cunningham-Burley, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: children's social, emotional and behavioural characteristics at entry to primary school, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/26102809/13

Bradshaw, P. and Cunningham-Burley, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: health inequalities in the early years, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved July 26, 2010 from hthttp://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/26103009/11

Marryat, L. and Martin, C. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: maternal mental health and its impact on child behaviour and development, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/26102536/11

Barnes, M., Chanfreau, J. and Tomaszewski, W. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: the circumstances of persistently poor children,
Growing Up in Scotland research findings, No 1(2010). Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/26095519/12

Melhuish, E. (2010) Impact of the home learning environment on child cognitive development: secondary analysis of data from 'Growing Up in Scotland', Edinburgh: Scottish Government Social Research. Retrieved July 26, 2010 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/04/27112324/12

Bradshaw, P. (2011) Growing Up in Scotland: changes in child cognitive ability in the pre-school years, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved November 7, 2011 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/31085122/11

Chanfreau, J. et al. (2011) Growing Up in Scotland: change in early childhood and the impact of significant events, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved November 7, 2011 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/25092325/13

Mabelis, J. and Marryat, L. (2011) Growing Up in Scotland: parental service use and informal networks in the early years, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved November 7, 2011 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/25092504/12

Parkes, A. and Wight D. (2011) Growing Up in Scotland: parenting and children's health, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved November 7, 2011 from http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/05/25092122/11

Cohort 2 Publications:

Bradshaw, P. et al. (2013). Growing Up in Scotland: Birth Cohort 2 – results from the first year, Edinburgh: Scottish Government. Retrieved December 16, 2013 from hhttp://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2013/02/3280/0

Resulting from secondary analysis:
Taulbut, M. and Walsh, D. (2013) Poverty, parenting and poor health: comparing early years' experiences in Scotland, England and three city regions, Glasgow Centre for Population Health, February. Retrieved August 2, 2013 from http://www.gcph.co.uk/assets/0000/3817/Poverty__parenting_and_poor_health.pdf

Zagel, H., Kadarsatat, G., Jacobs, M. and Glendinning, A. (2013) 'The effects of early years' childcare on child emotional and behavioural difficulties in lone and co-parent family situations', Journal of Social Policy, 42, pp.235-258. doi:10.1017/S0047279412000967

Sosu, E. (2014) 'Predicting maternal aspirations for their children’s education: the role of parental and child characteristics', International Journal of Educational Research, 67, pp.67-79. doi: 10.1016/j.ijer.2014.05.003

Kenway, P., Bushe, S., Tinson, A. and Barry Born, T. (2015) Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Scotland 2015, New Policy Institute. Retrieved July 20, 2015 from: http://npi.org.uk/files/6914/2736/4937/MPSE-scotland-full.pdf

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