Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2015-2016

Title details

SN: 8140
Title: Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2015-2016
Alternative title: CSEW
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-8140-1
Series: Crime Survey for England and Wales [Crime Survey for England and Wales, 1982-]
Depositor: Office for National Statistics
Principal investigator(s): Office for National Statistics
Data collector(s): TNS BMRB
Sponsor(s): Home Office
Ministry of Justice
Office for National Statistics

Citation

The citation for this study is:

Office for National Statistics. (2017). Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2015-2016. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 8140, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-8140-1

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Subject Categories

Crime and law enforcement - Law, crime and legal systems
Social attitudes and behaviour - Society and culture

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

Background:
The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), previously known as the British Crime Survey (BCS), has been in existence since 1981. The survey traditionally asks a sole randomly selected adult, in a random sample of households, details pertaining to any instances where they, or the household, has been a victim of a crime in the previous 12 months. These are recorded in the victim form data file (VF). A wide range of questions are then asked covering demographics and crime-related subjects such as attitudes to the police and the criminal justice system (CJS). Most of the questionnaire is completed in a face-to-face interview in the respondent's home; these variables are contained within the non-victim form (NVF) data file. Since 2009, the survey has been extended to children aged 10-15 years old; one resident of that age range has also been selected at random from the household and asked about incidents where they have been a victim of crime, and other related topics. The first set of children's data, covering January-December 2009, had experimental status, and is held separately under SN 6601. From 2009-2010, the children's data cover the same period as the adult data and are included with the main dataset. Further information may be found on the ONS Crime Survey for England and Wales webpage and for the previous BCS, from the GOV.UK BCS Methodology webpage.

Self-completion data
A series of questions on drinking behaviour, drug use, self-offending, gangs and personal security, and intimate personal violence (IPV) (including stalking and sexual victimisation) are administered to adults via a self-completion module which the respondent completes on a laptop computer. Children aged 10-15 years also complete a separate self-completion questionnaire. The questions are contained within the main questionnaire documents, but the data are not available with the main survey; they are available only under Secure Access conditions (see SN 7280).

Geographic variables:
From 2008-2009, low-level geographic variables are available under Secure Access conditions to match to the survey/ From 2011-2012 onwards, further lower-level geographic variables are also available under Secure Access conditions.

History:
Up to 2001, the survey was conducted biennially. From April 2001, interviewing was carried out continually and reported on in financial year cycles and the crime reference period was altered to accommodate this change. The core sample size has increased from around 11,000 in the earlier cycles to over 46,000 up until 2011/12 where it was then reduced to 35,000. Following the National Statistician's Review of Crime Statistics in June 2011 the collation and publication of Crime Statistics moved to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) from 1st April 2012, and the survey changed its name to the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) accordingly.

Scottish data:
The 1982 and 1988 BCS waves were also conducted in Scotland. The England and Wales data for 1982 and 1988 are held at the UKDA under SNs 1869 and 2706, but the Scottish data for these studies are held separately under SNs 4368 and 4599. Since 1993, separate Scottish Crime and Justice Surveys have been conducted, and these are held under GN 33330.

Main Topics:
The study includes information from the adult and child questionnaires. Data from the adult and child samples are available as separate files.

Adults:
The adult non-victim form questionnaire covers: perceptions of crime and local area; performance of the CJS; mobile phone crime; experiences of the police (Module A); attitudes to the CJS (Module B); crime prevention and security (Module C); online security (Module D); plastic card fraud; mass-marketing fraud; anti-social behaviour; demographics and media.

The adult victim form contains offence-level data. Up to six different incidents were asked about for each respondent. Each of these constituted a separate victim form and can be matched back to the respondent-level data. Topics covered included: the nature and circumstances of the incident; details of offenders; security measures; costs; emotional reactions; contact with the CJS; and outcomes where known.

Self-completion modules for adult respondents covered drug use and drinking behaviour, gangs and personal security, interpersonal violence (IPV) (domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking) and nature of partner domestic abuse. The data are subject to Secure Access conditions (see 'Access' section below).

Children:
The child questionnaire included: schooling and perceptions of crime; crime screener questions; victimisation module; perceptions of and attitudes towards the police; anti-social behaviour; and personal safety, crime prevention and security.

The child self-completion questionnaire covered: use of the internet; bullying; street gangs; school truancy; personal security; drinking behaviour and cannabis use. Data from the child self-completion questions are also available only under Secure Access.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Time period: The survey covers experiences of crime in the 12 months prior to interview.
Dates of fieldwork: April 2015 - March 2016
Country: England and Wales
Spatial units: Government Office Regions
Observation units: Individuals
Kind of data: Numeric data
Individual (micro) level
Universe: National
Adults
Crime victims
Criminal offences
Adults aged 16 and over in private households in England and Wales, and children aged 10-15 years resident in the same households, during 2015-2016. See documentation for further details.
Time dimensions: Repeated cross-sectional study
Sampling procedures: Multi-stage stratified random sample
Number of units: Adults: 35,324 cases. Children: 2,804 cases.
Method of data collection: Face-to-face interview; Self-completion
Self-completion
Computer-Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI) was used.
Weighting: Weighting used. See documentation for details.

Thesaurus search on keywords

View keywords... Hide keywords...
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICEADOLESCENTSADVICE
AGEAGGRESSIVENESSALCOHOL-RELATED CRIME
ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOURASSAULTATTITUDES
AUDIO EQUIPMENTBICYCLESBINGE DRINKING
BULLYINGBURGLARYCANNABIS
CAR PARKING AREASCHILDRENCHRONIC ILLNESS
CLUBSCOMMUNITIESCOMMUNITY ACTION
COMMUNITY BEHAVIOURCOMPUTERSCOSTS
COUNSELLINGCREDIT CARD USECRIME PREVENTION
CRIME VICTIMSCRIMINAL DAMAGECRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMCRIMINALSCULTURAL GOODS
CULTURAL IDENTITYDAMAGEDEBILITATIVE ILLNESS
DISCIPLINEDOMESTIC RESPONSIBILITIESDRINKING BEHAVIOUR
DRUG-RELATED CRIMEECONOMIC ACTIVITYECONOMIC VALUE
EDUCATIONAL ATTENDANCEEDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTEDUCATIONAL PERSONNEL
ELECTRONIC GAMESELECTRONIC MAILEMERGENCY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCESEMPLOYEESEMPLOYMENT
ENGLAND AND WALESETHNIC GROUPSEVERYDAY LIFE
FAMILIESFAMILY MEMBERSFEAR OF CRIME
FEARFINANCIAL COMPENSATIONFINANCIAL RESOURCES
FRAUDFREQUENCYFRIENDS
GENDERGUNSHARASSMENT
HEADS OF HOUSEHOLDHEALTHHOME OWNERSHIP
HOSPITALIZATIONHOURS OF WORKHOUSEHOLD HEAD'S ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
HOUSEHOLD HEAD'S OCCUPATIONHOUSEHOLDSHOUSING TENURE
INDUSTRIESINJURIESINTERNET ACCESS
INTERNET USEINTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONINTERPERSONAL CONFLICT
JUVENILE DELINQUENCYLANDLORDSLAW ENFORCEMENT
LEGAL PROCEDURELEISURE TIME ACTIVITIESLOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES
LOCKSMARITAL STATUSMEDICAL CARE
MOBILE PHONESNEIGHBOURHOODSNEIGHBOURS
OFFENCESONLINE SERVICESONLINE SHOPPING
PARENTSPERSONAL CONTACTPERSONAL FASHION GOODS
PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENTSPOLICE OFFICERSPOLICE SERVICES
PREJUDICEPUBLIC HOUSESPUBLIC TRANSPORT
QUALIFICATIONSQUALITY OF LIFERACIAL CONFLICT
RECIDIVISMREFUSERELIGIOUS AFFILIATION
RENTED ACCOMMODATIONRESIDENTIAL MOBILITYRESPONSIBILITY
RISKROAD SAFETYROBBERY
SAFETY AND SECURITY MEASURESSCHOOL DISCIPLINESCHOOL PUNISHMENTS
SECURITY SYSTEMSSELF-EMPLOYEDSIBLINGS
SMARTPHONESSOCIAL ACTIVITIES (LEISURE)SOCIAL HOUSING
SOCIAL PARTICIPATIONSOCIAL SUPPORTSTUDENT BEHAVIOUR
STUDENTSTERRORIST ACTSTHEFT
TRAINING COURSESTRUANCYUNDERAGE DRINKING
UNEMPLOYMENTUNWAGED WORKERSVAGRANTS
VISITS (PERSONAL)VOLUNTARY WELFARE ORGANIZATIONSWEAPONS
WORKPLACEYOUTH CRIMEYOUTH CULTURE
YOUTH EMPLOYMENTYOUTH GANGSYOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT
YOUTH

Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 17 February 2017
Copyright: Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland
Access conditions: The depositor has specified that registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. See terms and conditions for further information.
Please note: The Office for National Statistics (ONS) took over administration of the CSEW/BCS from 2012. Data from most of the self-completion modules fielded over the survey years are now available under Secure Access conditions, to ONS Accredited Researchers only (see SN 7280). These include:
  • Drug use data from 1996 onwards;
  • Drinking behaviour data from 2002-2003 onwards;
  • Interpersonal Violence (IPV), covering domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking modules fielded across various years from 1996-2010/11; and
  • Stolen goods data from 2002/03 and 2005/06-2007/08.
Prospective users should contact the HelpDesk in the first instance.
Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
Questionnaires: Adults and Children, 2015-16 8140_questionnaires.pdf 1631
User Guide to Crime Statistics for England and Wales, 2017 8140_userguidecrimestats.pdf 1229
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_8140_Information.htm 6
READ File read8140.htm 10
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Related studies:

  British Crime Survey, 1982: England and Wales Data (SN 1869)
  British Crime Survey, 1984 (SN 2077)
  British Crime Survey, 1988 (SN 2706)
  British Crime Survey, 1992 (SN 3202)
  British Crime Survey, 1994 (SN 3591)
  British Crime Survey, 1996 (SN 3832)
  British Crime Survey, 1998 (SN 4081)
  British Crime Survey, 1982 : Scottish Data (SN 4368)
  British Crime Survey, 2000 (SN 4463)
  British Crime Survey, 1988 : Scottish Data (SN 4599)
  British Crime Survey, 2001 (SN 4786)
  British Crime Survey, 2001-2002 (SN 4787)
  British Crime Survey, 2002-2003 (SN 5059)
  British Crime Survey, 2003-2004 (SN 5324)
  British Crime Survey, 2004-2005 (SN 5347)
  British Crime Survey, 2005-2006 (SN 5543)
  British Crime Survey, 2006-2007 (SN 5755)
  British Crime Survey, 2007-2008 (SN 6066)
  British Crime Survey, 2008-2009 (SN 6367)
  British Crime Survey Experimental Data: Children Aged 10-15 Years, January-December, 2009 (SN 6601)
  British Crime Survey, 2009-2010 (SN 6627)
  British Crime Survey, 2010-2011 (SN 6937)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2011-2012 (SN 7252)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2012-2013 (SN 7422)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2013-2014 (SN 7619)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2014-2015 (SN 7889)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, Fraud Field Trial, 2015 (SN 8056)
  Young People and Crime Survey, 1992-1993 (SN 3814)
  Youth Lifestyles Survey, 1998-1999 (SN 4345)
  British Crime Survey, 2000: Teaching Dataset (SN 4740)
  British Crime Survey, 2000: X4L SDiT Teaching Dataset (SN 4918)
  Experience and Expression in the Fear of Crime, 2003-2004 (SN 5822)
  British Crime Survey 2007-2008: Teaching Dataset (SN 6561)
  British Crime Survey 2007-2008: Unrestricted Access Teaching Dataset (SN 6891)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2011-2012: Teaching Dataset (SN 7401)
  Long-Term Trajectories of Crime in the United Kingdom, 1982-2013 (SN 7875)
  Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2013-2014: Teaching Dataset (SN 7911)
  Which Burglary Security Devices Work for Whom and in What Context? 2013-2015: Secure Access (SN 8120)

Related case studies:

Surprising psychology students with crime data
Using government survey evidence to explore fear of crime
Are people with disabilities more likely to experience violence?

Publications

View publications... Hide publications...

By principal investigator(s):
Links to more recent publications may be found on the ONS Crime Survey for England and Wales webpages and the Home Office BCS Methodology webpages.

Previous technical reports and papers, 1982-2001:

Wood, D. (1982) British crime survey: technical report, London: SCPR.

National Opinion Polls (1985) 1984 British Crime Survey: technical report, London: NOP.

Social and Community Planning Research (1988) 1988 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report, London: SCPR.

Allen, D. and Payne, D. (1991) Crime prevention in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey, Scottish Office.

Allen, D. and Payne, D. (1991) The public and the police in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey, Scottish Office.

Payne, D. (1992) Crime in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey, Scottish Office.

Kinsey, R. and Anderson, S. (1992) Crime and quality of life - public perceptions and experiences of crime in Scotland: findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey, Scottish Office.

Hales, J. (1993) 1992 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report, London: SCPR.

White, A. and Malbon, G. (June 1995) 1994 British Crime Survey: technical report, London: OPCS Social Survey Division.

Hales, J. and Stratford, N. (1996?) 1996 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report, London: SCPR.

Hales, J. and Stratford, N. (1999) 1998 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report, London: SCPR.

Hales, J., et al. (2001) 2000 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report, London: National Centre for Social Research.

Budd, T. (2001) Burglary: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 5/01, London: Home Office.

Kinshott, G. (2001) Vehicle related thefts: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 6/01, London: Home Office.

Mattinson, J. (2001) Stranger and acquaintance violence: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 7/01, London: Home Office.

Budd, T. and Sims, L. (2001) Antisocial behaviour and disorder: findings from the 2000 British Crime Survey, Findings 145, London: Home Office.

Resulting from secondary analysis:
Pease, K. (1988) Judgements of crime seriousness : findings from the 1984 British Crime Survey, Research and Planning Unit Paper 44, London: Home Office.

Shah, R. and Pease, K. (1992) `Crime, race and reporting to the police' Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 31, pp.192-199.

Webb, P.M. (1994) Housing tenure as a determinant of the decision to report vandalism to the police: secondary analysis of the 1988 British Crime Survey, England and Wales, Dissertation for MSc Social Research, University of Surrey, September.

Bucke, T. (1997) Ethnicity and contacts with the police: latest findings from the British Crime Survey, Research Findings No.59, Research and Statistics Directorate, London: Home Office.

Ramsay, M. and Spiller, J. (1997) Drug misuse declared in 1996: latest findings from the British Crime Survey, Home Office Research Study 172, London: Home Office. ISBN 1-85893-917-8.

Hough, M. and Roberts, J. (1998) Attitudes to punishment: findings from the British Crime Survey, Home Office Research Study 179, London: Home Office. ISBN 1-84082-017-9.

Macdonald, Z. (1999) 'Illicit drug use in the UK', British Journal of Criminology, 39(4), pp.585-608.

Macdonald, Z. (2000) 'Illicit drug use, unemployment and occupational attainment', Journal of Health Economics, 19, pp.1089-1115.

Macdonald, Z. (2000) 'The impact of under-reporting on the relationship between unemployment and property crime', Applied Economic Letters, 7, pp.659-663.

Macdonald, Z. and Pudney, S. (2000) 'Analysing drug abuse with British Crime Survey data: modelling and questionnaire design issues', Applied Statistics, 49(1), pp.95-117.

Data from the British Crime Survey, 2000: Teaching Dataset (SN 4740) has been used for the following textbook:
Tarling, R. (2008) Statistical modelling for social researchers: principles and practice, Oxford: Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-415-44840-6. The book's companion web site includes downloadable datasets and further information: retrieved 26 March, 2013, from http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415448406/links.asp.

Equality and Human Rights Commission (2013) Standard of Living, Measurement Framework Series Briefing Paper no.10, Manchester: Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Iparraguirre, J. (2014) 'Hate crime against older people in England and Wales – an econometric enquiry', Journal of Adult Protection, 16(3).

Bennett, T.H. and Holloway, K. (2014) 'Drug use among university students: Findings from a national survey', Journal of Substance Use, Early Online: January 2014. doi:10.3109/14659891.2013.878762

Bennett, T.H. (2014) 'Differences in the age-drug use curve among students and non-students in the UK', Drug and Alcohol Review, 33(3), pp.280-6. Epub 2014 Mar 25. doi: 10.1111/dar.12100

Walby, S., Towers, J. and Francis, B. (2014) 'Mainstreaming domestic and gender-based violence in to sociology and the criminology of violence', The Sociological Review, 62(S2), pp.187-214.

Brennan, I. (2015) 'Victim responses to violence: the effect of alcohol context on crime labeling', Journal of Interpersonal Violence, pp.1-25. DOI: 10.1177/0886260514564068

Walby, S., Towers, J. and Francis, B. (2016) 'Is violent crime increasing or decreasing? A new methodology to measure repeat attacks making visible the significance of gender and domestic relations', British Journal of Criminology, 56(6), pp.1203-1234.

Ludwig, A. and McLean, I. (2016) Principles of police funding in the UK, Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy Working Paper.

McLean, I., Norton, M. and Ludwig, A. (2016) What are PCCs for? The intended role of Police and Crime Commissioners and their performance since 2012, Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy Working Paper.

Ludwig, A., Norton, M. and McLean, I. (2017) Resource allocation processes in policing in Great Britain – project report, Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy Paper.

Ludwig, A., Norton, M. and McLean, I. (2017) Measuring police effectiveness, Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy Working Paper.

Walby, S. and Towers, J. (2017) 'Measuring violence to end violence: Mainstreaming gender', Journal of Gender-Based Violence, 1(1), pp.11-31.

Walby, S., Towers, J., Balderston, S., Corradi, C., Francis, B., Heiskanen, M., Helweg-Larsen, K., Mergaert, L., Olive, P., Palmer, P., Stockl, H. and Strid, S. (2017) The concept and measurement of violence against women and men, Bristol, Policy Press.

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Crime Survey for England and Wales, 2015-2016

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