Catalogue

UK Data Service data catalogue record for:

Thame, Oxfordshire in the Seventeenth Century

Title details

SN: 4132
Title: Thame, Oxfordshire in the Seventeenth Century
Persistent identifier: 10.5255/UKDA-SN-4132-1
Depositor: Hodges, M., Thame History Group
Principal investigator(s): Bell, J., Thame History Project
Bell, M., Thame History Project
Bretherton, D., Thame History Project
Cray, J., Thame History Project
Fickling, H., Thame History Project
Grof, L., Thame History Project
Hammond, D., Thame History Project
Hawkins, A., Thame History Project
Hodges, M., Thame History Project
Motla, P., Thame History Project
Williams, P., Thame History Project
Sponsor(s): Thame Town Council

Citation

The citation for this study is:

Bell, J., Bell, M., Bretherton, D., Cray, J., Fickling, H., Grof, L., Hammond, D., Hawkins, A., Hodges, M., Motla, P., Williams, P. (2000). Thame, Oxfordshire in the Seventeenth Century. [data collection]. UK Data Service. SN: 4132, http://doi.org/10.5255/UKDA-SN-4132-1

Select the text above to add data citation in your outputs.

Select citation format: 
XML citation formats:  CSL  EndNote

Subject Categories

Agricultural and rural history - History
Community and urban studies - Society and culture
Economic history - History
Economic systems and development - Economics
General - Employment and labour
Historical geography - History
Local history - History

Abstract

Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.

The aim of this project was to produce a social and economic history of the town of Thame, Oxfordshire in the seventeenth century, with special emphases on the way in which local families controlled the town's economy and on the connections between agriculture and the trades of the town. A biographical dictionary is being prepared in addition to the database and this has involved some family reconstitution.
The Thame History Research Group has its origins in a local history class organised by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education.
Main Topics:
The Thame History Group has transcribed and made available a range of documents for seventeenth century Thame including wills, inventories, parish registers, hearth tax records, rentals, Civil War assessments, school accounts, lay subsidy returns, frankpledge court rolls, poor rate books, quarter session records and monumental inscriptions in the parish church.
The database consists of a series of tables corresponding to the different sources used, a table holding surnames with information on spelling variations and family groupings, a table holding surnames, occupations and occupation codes, one holding status and status codes, and a table holding bibliographic information about the sources used.

Coverage, universe, methodology

Time period: 1549 - 1710 - The bulk of the data is seventeenth century in provenance, but a small number of selected sources lie outside this period.
Dates of fieldwork: 1988 - 1999
Country: England
Geography: Thame
Oxfordshire
Spatial units: No information recorded
Observation units: Individuals
Kind of data: Textual data
Numeric data
Individual (micro) level
Universe: Subnational
Inhabitants of Thame, Oxfordshire in the seventeenth century
Time dimensions: Time Series
Sampling procedures: No sampling (total universe)
Method of data collection: Transcription of existing materials; Compilation or synthesis of existing material
Weighting: No information recorded
Data sources: A range of documents for seventeenth century Thame was transcribed. They include wills, inventories, other probate records, parish registers, hearth tax records, rentals, Civil War assessments, school accounts, lay subsidy returns, frankpledge court rolls, poor rate books, quarter session records and monumental inscriptions in the parish church.

Thesaurus search on keywords

Administrative and access information

Date of release:
First edition: 05 December 2000
Copyright: Copyright Thame History Group and Mary Hodges
Access conditions: The depositor has specified that registration is required and standard conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. See terms and conditions for further information.
Availability: UK Data Service
Contact: Get in touch

Documentation

Title File Name Size (KB)
Study Guide context.pdf 21
Study Guide fisc.pdf 26
Study Guide instructions.pdf 18
Study Guide sourceslist.pdf 22
Study Guide structure.pdf 43
Study information and citation UKDA_Study_4132_Information.htm 18
READ File read4132.txt 4

Publications

View publications... Hide publications...

By principal investigator(s):
Motla, P. (1994) 'Changing attitudes to poverty in Thame 1600-1700' Oxfordshire Local History 4 (4), Spring, pp.120.

  • Motla, P. (1993) 'The occupational structure of Thame, 1600-1700' Oxfordshire Local History 4 (2), Spring, pp.44-54.
  • Cray, J. (1990) 'Family reconstitutions: the Cotton and Messenger families in Thame, 1600-1665' Oxfordshire Local History 3 (4), Spring, pp.166-169.
  • Motla, P. (1990) 'Agriculture and trade: the economy of Thame, 1600-1680' Oxfordshire Local History 3 (4), Spring, pp.153-165.
  • Bell, J. (1990) 'The mortality crisis in Thame and east Oxfordshire 1643' Oxfordshire Local History 3 (4), Spring, pp.137-152.

    Resulting from secondary analysis:
    Garlick, J., (1991) 'Farming activities at Thame and Woodstock in the early 17th century: the evidence of probate inventories' Oxfordshire Local History 3(7), Autumn, pp.291-317.

  • Syntax/Code

    No previously uploaded files

      (login required)

    Upload syntax/code file


    4132
    Thame, Oxfordshire in the Seventeenth Century

    I agree to the terms and conditions *

    Confirm new syntax/code file version


    A previous version of syntax file "" has already been uploaded and approved.

    If you continue with this upload, the previous version of the syntax file will be overwritten with this new version.

    This new version of the syntax file will be subject to the UK Data Service approval process before it becomes available for download.

    Do you want to continue?

        


    Back to top